Posted On: March 25, 2011

Sol LeWitt

Mad. Sq. Art 2005 exhibits two new works by artist Sol LeWitt. Presented by the Madison Square Park Conservancy, Mad. Sq. Art is Manhattan’s free outdoor art gallery with regularly scheduled exhibitions of new work created for the park by major artists.

For Mad. Sq. Art 2005, artist Sol LeWitt has created two major concrete-block pieces for exhibition in the park. Circle with Towers, at the southern end of the park, is a three-foot-high concrete-block ring, twenty-five feet in diameter, punctuated by eight fourteen-foot-high towers at equal intervals. On the east side of the park is a partner sculpture, also in concrete block, Curved Wall with Towers, a sinuous eighty-five-foot long unfurling of a form closely related to Circle with Towers. Curved Wall has seventeen fourteen-foot-high towers placed at equal intervals. The face of the concrete block is sandblasted and bleached to the artist’s specifications. The two pieces demonstrate LeWitt’s career-long fascination with the cube and his more recent exploration of the potential of the concrete block in art.

 

The two Sol LeWitt sculptures were built for the Madison Square Park Conservancy by the Rad & D’Aprile Corporation and workers from Allied Bricklayers & Craftworkers Union Local #1 under the supervision of principal assistant Jeremy Ziemann.

 

About Sol LeWitt:

A working artist in New York since the 1950s, LeWitt is a key figure in the development of Minimal and Conceptual art. He remains true to the approach to art that he developed in the 1960s, emphasizing concept over expression, and allowing other people to bring these concepts into physical form. Thus the two sculptures were built in the park to the artist’s specifications by a team of masons over the month of April 2005.

Sol LeWitt (b. Hartford 1928) has been the subject of hundreds of solo exhibitions in museums and galleries, and is represented in the collections of major museums worldwide. Retrospective exhibitions of his work have taken place at, among others, the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Tate Gallery, London; The Kunsthalle, Bern; and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Another major retrospective organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in February 2000 traveled to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, in July 2000 and to the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, in December 2000.